Food security

An estimated 1.6 million Palestinians across the occupied Palestinian territory, or 27 per cent of households, are food insecure (as of the end of 2015). This results from high unemployment, low household incomes and a high cost of living. The former two are the result of the protracted conflict, repeated shocks and continued restrictions on freedom of movement, constrained productive capacities and a lack of economic opportunities. Although food is available, it is priced out of reach for many. Numerous households are food insecure even though they already receive food and other assistance.

Articles, statements and press releases

5 June 2018 |
A Palestinian refugee receiving a food basket in the Al Shatti distribution center, Gaza city © 2017 UNRWA Photo by Rushdi Al-Sarraj.

The findings of a Household Expenditure and Consumption Survey, released by the Palestinian Central Bureau of Statistics (PCBS) in May, show a significant increase in poverty rates in the Gaza Strip: from 38.8 per cent in 2011 (the previous time poverty was measured) to 53 per cent by the end of 2017, which is the equivalent to around 1.01 million people, including over 400,000 children.6 This means that poverty increased by more than 14 percentage points in a period of six years.

13 May 2018 |

Humanitarian agencies operating in the Gaza Strip warned today that a prolonged closure of the Kerem Shalom crossing, Gaza’s almost exclusive point for the entry of goods, may exacerbate the already dire situation of services and livelihoods.

10 May 2018 |
Woman in her peas field on her land in Shokat as Sufi, Gaza Strip. Photo by Wissam Sameer Mahmoud Nassar for ACTED oPt, September 2017

Success story published as part of the Humanitarian Fund report for 2017: The escalation of hostilities in Gaza in 2014 had significant consequences for local agriculture, where loss of productive land and assets, coupled with a lack of financial capacity to cover production costs, led Gaza’s agricultural sector to decline by 31per cent from 2014. Since 2017, the ongoing electricity crisis, combined with increased lack of access to quality water resources, further weakened the agricultural sector in the Gaza Strip, exacerbating farmers’ vulnerabilities.

10 May 2018 |
Woman in her peas field on her land in Shokat as Sufi, Gaza Strip. Photo by Wissam Sameer Mahmoud Nassar for ACTED oPt, September 2017

Success story published as part of the Humanitarian Fund report for 2017: The escalation of hostilities in Gaza in 2014 had significant consequences for local agriculture, where loss of productive land and assets, coupled with a lack of financial capacity to cover production costs, led Gaza’s agricultural sector to decline by 31per cent from 2014. Since 2017, the ongoing electricity crisis, combined with increased lack of access to quality water resources, further weakened the agricultural sector in the Gaza Strip, exacerbating farmers’ vulnerabilities.

5 April 2018 |
A Gazan fisherman removes the catch from his fishing net. © FAO/Marco Longari

In 1994, a permitted fishing range of 20 nautical miles (NM) was agreed between Israel and the Palestinian Liberation Organization (PLO). In practice, Israel only allowed fishing up to 12 NM until 2006, when the fishing zone was reduced to six and later to three NM. According to the Israeli authorities, “Hamas has established naval forces with significant military capabilities, as seen during operation “Protective Edge” when Hamas naval commando infiltrated Israel and were detected near an Israeli village. This situation required Israel to tighten its security restrictions at sea to prevent similar future attacks.”

15 March 2018 |
Poster hung by Israeli forces in Hizma

Since 28 January 2018, the three access roads into Hizma village have been totally or partially blocked to Palestinian traffic by the Israeli military, and remain so at the time of writing. Hizma is a Palestinian village of over 7000 residents in Jerusalem governorate. The bulk of its built-up area is in Area B, but small parts of the village lie in Area C or within the municipal boundaries of Jerusalem, separated from the rest of the city by the Barrier.